10 Strategies to Recover from Excessive Stress

October 20, 2014 – 8:30 am
    What are the 10 Strategies for using exercise as a way to prepare for and recover from excessive stress? Before we can understand these strategies, we must begin with a shift in our perspective of how we function and why we exercise and eat. The obsolete idea of your meals and movement as a method for increasing work output derived from the Industrial Age in a mechanistic view of the world where cog A turns wheel B, and adding fuel and fire moves you; neglecting to consider what is burned, what fumes are emitted, and how the toxicity of those gases affect you. The concept of your body as a computer where you must activate programs in your movement through routines in order to increase operational efficiency came from the recent Digital Age, but is only a little better than the prior... You are more than a collection of subroutines. As we ...

Boost your Human Growth Hormone by 771% in < 30 minutes

October 19, 2014 – 8:57 am
Explosive complexes like the Gable-Grip Suplex can boost your human growth hormone by 771% in less than 30 minutes. After age 30, you begin "somatopause" where HGH levels plateau and then drop dramatically; unless you integrate TACFIT type training intensity. The longer you maintain HGH release, the longer you keep your robust health and strength over your lifetime and career. One of my favorite old school wrestling drills came from my years on the USA National Team: the Gable-Grip Suplex: The low squat opens the hips and the forward spinal flexion activates the "hollow body" (and into resisting the backward flexion of the throw). The deadlift transitions into a snatch motion with hip extension, heel lift and scap elevation for the explosion of the throw. Even with only a 100lbs dummy, the system effect of this whole bodily lift activates HGH (your "fitness hormone") release. Before you begin the Gable-Grip Suplex, make sure you ...

TACFIT Quad Press: The 4 Wheel Pushup

October 18, 2014 – 10:00 am
The TACFIT Quad Press is to the Push Press as the Pushup is to the Military Press. The goal of the Quad Press differs from that of the pushup, in that the load in the Quad Press is recruit the lower body and to store potential (elastic) power and then release it into the next repetition. Like both the push press and the military press are two different tools in the toolbox, both useful, so too, are the quad press and the pushup up. TACFIT Quad Press Coaching Cues: Hands / forearms rotate inward at 45 degrees, to form a diamond with the hands. Elbows are back from the shoulder plane at a 45 degree angle; with the lats engaged / activated. The back is parallel to the ground to ensure both the upper and lower body act equally speed / power. Knees are rotated at hips outward at a 45 degree angle. Heels are rotated ...

Lower Back Hurt? Don’t Stretch it! Do YOUR Down Dog!

October 17, 2014 – 1:38 pm
Earlier, I wrote a tutorial on the differences between Eastern and Western needs in "Upward Facing Dog" due to the cultural distinctions between seated and squatted culture. Honestly (*gasp*), I don't find one preferable over the other: it's a cultural tendency; one isn't "more anthropologically correct" than the other. I was asked to address another popular pose from this perspective, but I had to add in a "wrong." The "wrong" here reflects the attempt to achieve (or impose) a posture, without understanding the cultural adaptations of a Western (seated) lifestyle. Eastern cultures, being more squat biased, tend to have lengthened/weakened calves and hamstrings, where Western cultures, being more sitting biased, tend to have more tightened/strong calves and hamstrings. This bias impacts hip tightness: squatters have more mobile hips, sitters have tighter hips. So, what is the correct form in Downward Facing Dog? For the squatter, the hams and calves are long/weak, the hips are ...

The Camshaft: Pain-Free, Injury-Preventative, Expressible Power!

October 16, 2014 – 8:58 am
Most adults injure themselves when pressing during rotation, because when (if) people do exercise, they only build strength in the anterior (front) or posterior (rear) chain of muscles. This is fine when in the protection of a gym and in the isolation of a foundational exercise to exclusively push (i.e. bench press or squat press) or pull (i.e. bent over row or deadlift). However, occupational and behavioral (lifestyle) patterns, such as extended duration sitting in an office chair, car seat, and home couch, create tightness. In particular, these patterns create tightness: in the hips (femoroacetabular joints), mid-back (thoracic vertebral joints) and shoulders (glenohumeral joints). These 3 areas were designed and evolved for mobility and absorbing force, like a spring. When they are tight, the immobility then needs to be compensated by adding mobility into neighboring joints: the knees, lower back and shoulder blades. Unfortunately, these joints were designed and evolved for stability and expressing force, like a buttress. ...

Job-Irrelevant Exercise is Costing You Money and Quality Of Life

October 15, 2014 – 3:54 pm
Why are most police, firefighters, EMTs and soldiers apathetic toward their fitness requirements? 1. Because the requirements are not job-related. The typical physical training exam for the tactical community involves a 1.5 mile jog, max pushups in a minute, max sit-ups in a minute, sit-and-reach flexibility test. To put this into context: the average pursuit distance for law enforcement is a 70 meter sprint, not a 1.5 mile jog - the wrong distance and the wrong energy system. Why be enthusiastic about that which not only helps you, but because it trains you for the wrong event, hinders you? 2. Because the requirements cause a statistically significant amount of injuries. In one federal law enforcement agency, there was an average of 31% injury rate from training (12-15 were injured from training, out of every 48 recruits in an academy class); not combatives, not scenarios, but from exercise! Firstly, exercise is designed to ...

Which Upward Facing Dog Variation Do You Need?

October 15, 2014 – 11:21 am
Someone pointed out that from one program and seminar to the next, I use different variations of Upward Facing Dog, and someone in my presentation at the Australian Yoga Conference pointed out that I even had given two variations in the same event. Then, he asked, why? Yoga is only as good as it is specific to the needs of the individuals using it. In the West, I primarily train seated culture, and more often the chronically seated and load-bearing subculture of the tactical community. The East is primarily a squatting culture, unloaded, not wearing body armor and duty belts. As a result of these sociocultural behavioral tendencies, the countries I train in the East tend to exhibit weakened hamstrings due to excessive elongation from a squatting bias; while the countries I train in the West tend to have tight hamstrings because they are shortened from being seated and from loadbearing. As a ...

The #1 Most Effective Way to Guarntee Consistency?

October 15, 2014 – 8:11 am
Accountability is the number one most effective method of ensuring that you continue a program and maintain good technique... If the group holds each other accountable to consistency and quality. Even when alone, I imagine that I would let so many down, if I diminish my technique for the ego's satisfaction of delirious quantity. Others deserve my best; and so do I. Social psychology demonstrates that the higher the held standard, the more people will lift to the increased expectations. If the bar lowers, people will fall to the level of decreased expectations. However, this accountability factor is indiscriminate: if you hold each other accountable to quantity, weight, speed, even pain, people will override neurological safety mechanisms in order to meet those expectations. So, hold each other accountable to "Time Under Technique" - which means both consistency of and quality of performance. This will keep everyone safe AND progressing. High intensity is a double-edged sword: ...

Progress: The Science We Predict - The Art We Practice

October 14, 2014 – 10:42 am
Progress isn't random. It's observable, measurable and predictable. Like any unit of energy, it has the anatomy of a wave, with crests and troughs, which spiral through an observable frequency of releasing energy (work) and storing energy (recovery). At first, you'll need more recovery, but then, you'll find your rhythm, and as long as you keep consistent (in "phase"), progress will continue to spiral upward. But when life strikes some discord with your consistency, you'll need to downshift the frequency to store up more energy again. The science of progress, we can know. The art of progress, we must practice and practice and practice. Today's WOD @ high intensity; 4 rounds of 30 seconds of continuous work / 30 seconds of active recovery: RND1: 56 Jump Lunges; +2 over yesterday RND2: 18 Kettlebell (Short Cycle) Push Presses (32kgs); +4 over yesterday RND3: 18 Kettlebell (Short Cycle) Push Presses (32kgs); +4 over yesterday RND4: 12 Medicine Ball Spartan ...

The Neurchemistry of Tactical Fitness TACFIT

October 14, 2014 – 10:41 am
The Neurochemistry of Tactical Fitness TACFIT 1. The same neurochemical phenomena experienced during high stress emergency crises and violent encounters can be produced through post heart rate maximum exercise. These psycho-trophic phenomena include tunnel vision, time warp (tachipsychia), auditory exclusion, cognitive dysfunction, short term memory loss, fumbling, feinting, loss of coordination in fine and complex motor skills. 2. These phenomena do not happen under heart rate maximum, and they are eliminated when the heart rate drops beneath maximum. 3. Active recovery methods can be used to rapidly drop the heart rate under maximum; such as breathing techniques, biofeedback, vibration drills, mental strategies, et cetera. 4. The nervous system cannot differentiate between types of stress; it only knows cumulative magnitude of stress. 5. These active recovery methods re-stabilize volatile biochemistry irrespective of type of stress, and so can be internalized through practice during post heart rate maximum exercise stress. 6. Since the nervous system cannot differentiate between ...