Pullup and Kettlebell Snatch Pain (Teres Major)

June 22, 2017 – 12:50 pm

If you've experienced pain in your armpit and shoulder blade from kettlebell snatches or pullups, it's often due to straining teres major, an internal rotator and adductor of the arm. Many people misunderstand this muscle, and attempt to self-treat the latissimus dorsi, but unlike the lat, teres major has a more intimate relationship with the scap and humerus (hence, it's often over-developed in throwing sports). It often becomes tight and shortened resulting in strain from pullups due to the imbalance in timing between your dominant and non-dominant hand. Other times, it becomes strained due to the lengthening phase of the swing, into the sudden contractile phase of the top fixation in the snatch. It's most often seen strained during throwing sports like baseball and judo, but also in grappling while resisting being triangled or arm-barred from inside an opponent's guard. When self-assessing overhead range, look for changes in scapulohumeral motion. Your scap will upwardly rotate more on the strained side due to teres major shortening (which prevents proper separation of scapula and humeral arm movement). A tight teres will drag up the scap because they can't get divorced. This movement series will re-educate the teres major to release through first "mirroring" the unstrained range, and then adding in light resistance against upward rotation, and finally add in external rotation resistance. As a result, if anything is significantly painful, first consult your physician before beginning any exercise, and never move into anything deeper than only mild discomfort. @the_mobility_ring www.mobilityring.com #scottsonnon #mobilityring #mobility #nmap #rmaxinternational #kettlebellkings #tacfit

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If you’ve experienced pain in your armpit and shoulder blade from kettlebell snatches or pullups, it’s often due to straining teres major, an internal rotator and adductor of the arm. Many people misunderstand this muscle, and attempt to self-treat the latissimus dorsi, but unlike the lat, teres major has a more intimate relationship with the scap and humerus (hence, it’s often over-developed in throwing sports).

It often becomes tight and shortened resulting in strain from pullups due to the imbalance in timing between your dominant and non-dominant hand. Other times, it becomes strained due to the lengthening phase of the swing, into the sudden contractile phase of the top fixation in the snatch. It’s most often seen strained during throwing sports like baseball and judo, but also in grappling while resisting being triangled or arm-barred from inside an opponent’s guard.

When self-assessing overhead range, look for changes in scapulohumeral motion. Your scap will upwardly rotate more on the strained side due to¬† teres major shortening (which prevents proper separation of scapula and humeral arm movement). A tight teres will drag up the scap because they can’t get divorced.

This movement series will re-educate the teres major to release through first “mirroring” the unstrained range, and then adding in light resistance against upward rotation, and finally add in external rotation resistance.

As a result, if anything is significantly painful, first consult your physician before beginning any exercise, and never move into anything deeper than only mild discomfort.

#scottsonnon #mobilityring #mobility #nmap #rmaxinternational #kettlebellkings #tacfit

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